Last week, I talked briefly about the velocity of money and how a slow velocity is synonymous with poor circulation of money because it’s stored in large homes and yachts and such. Well, in this case, velocity is near zero because you’re not spending your money at the store but giving it to a bank, a collector, etc. That’s why so many malls are closing. Even a movie ticket seems like a real expense these days. Disposable income after more necessary expenses is near zero. Honestly, it’s almost always below zero because we use our credit cards for necessary purchases, as well. I mean, if they’re necessary, we just have to, no?

Somehow, among all of this, our personal expenses, aside from loan payments, are actually going up. It defies economics, but at this point, the price-quantity relationship isn’t as strong as companies’s incentives to just raise the price however much they want. Someone is going to pay. They don’t care. Moreover, fewer units at a gigantic price is cheaper for them to produce anyway. So it’s the gift that keeps on giving.

So with these higher prices on necessary expenses, debt you can’t even quantify let alone imagine paying off someday, ever-increasing underemployment and minimum wage jobs, predatory employment practices, and being one broken ankle away from insolvency, it’s obvious that we’re being bankrupted. I honestly think it’s intentional. I don’t believe it’s malicious, but I do think, since money is obviously a limited resource, it’s an intentional transfer of wealth from the 99% to the 1% and large corporations who just hold onto it. It’s likely because the baby boomers are so afraid to turn the economy over to millennials and want to hoard it as long as they can. We’ll get our chance, whatever’s left of us at that time.

What can Trump do about all of this, and what will he do?

In this case, I can say with a smile that he can do A LOT! There is nothing holding back the Office of the Presidency or any branch of the government from doing anything they want about this.

REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS! REGULATIONS!

PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT! PUNISHMENT!

GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE! OW A SPINE! GROW A SPINE!

Not professional? No? Okay, well then. They NEED to get rid of Citizens United, pay to play, banks that write the darn laws themselves, wage theft, any talk of repealing Dodd-Frank, and all the people who cause these crises in the first place!

14 comments

  1. Great article shedding light on these economic issues. Outstanding student loan debt is like a house of cards that will eventually collapse. A key phrase in your article is “fiduciary duty to constantly raise earnings per share”, which will always create great wealth and great poverty, as one cannot exist without the other in a credit-based economy that strives for infinite growth.

  2. I have a slightly different take on this.

    (1) Executives at companies with more than 1,000 employees have little control over what their companies do, other than buying and selling components. Ask them what R&D in any of their divisions is doing on a particular day — no clue. One of my assignments in trying to turn around a troubled company was to find out what projects were underway and which ones might have so real value in the future (value as in the ability to create revenue). Management didn’t know.

    (2) Technology has changed the relationship between workers and product. We simply don’t need all of the workers to produce the same amount of stuff. Instead, we need creativity to help find new stuff to make.

    (3) Unfortunately, there’s a lag in communications between markets, companies, schools and students. Part of our problem is having too many people lacking skills or with obsolete skills (e.g., COBOL programmers). Finishing high school should not be optional for anyone. Nor should at least a two-year college degree. However, we need to strengthen adult learning and teach people that stopping learning is economic suicide.

    (4) Hand-in-hand with item (3), basic college education should be free, as it is in much of the rest of the world (Europe, the Middle East, China, etc.). That reform takes care of the debt issue.

    Unfortunately, US politics is dominated by a small cadre of rich and greedy who place themselves above law and country, and make the rules in Congress. That’s why a thinking person has to consider seriously the idea of living someplace else. Upwards of 3% of US citizens now live in another country (that excludes military/government workers stationed offshore). Free healthcare (in many cases, better healthcare), free education, lower food and housing costs are powerful incentives.

  3. Reblogged this on sportyoldude and commented:
    I worked up to three jobs as a student just to feed myself and put a roof over my head, and that was in 70″s when tuition was a lot cheaper. part of the reason for the inflated tuitions is the NCAA a pernicious parasite that sucks the money out of schools and universities and gives little in return. they are listed as a non profit an insult to anyones intelligence.

  4. I would like to thank you for following my blog. Although our beliefs may not overlap at times, it is people like you, with an open mind and accepting heart, that give me hope in the other sides of the political spectrum.

    1. Thank you for your comment. I’m glad you’re here. I certainly want to learn about everybody, and when there’s something that doesn’t seem to add up, I don’t run away from it. I ask about it.

      Please share your thoughts about any of my posts and any additional information you may have. You’re welcome here.

  5. I’m still waiting on a national politician willing to push hard on exactly the points you make here. Someone to make it their central issue. Elizabeth Warren is the closest it seems.

    I mean, these are huge problems that can damage a society long term. But most politicians either openly dismiss or at a minimum pay lip service. It’s frustrating.

    1. Thank you, Jon. I support Senator Warren’s opinion on a number of issues. Another is wage theft, which I wrote about a few weeks ago.

      It may be a complex issue, the more likely scenario is the one that you’ve presented. I don’t know that no one cares, but I think they still have this bygone ethos that “everything will work out in the end.” The younger generations can’t justify that outlook.

      Despite what baby boomers say about us, we’re actually MORE responsible than them, and we want some assurances. We’re tired of analogies to “bootstraps” and “grindstones,” and I don’t want to ever hear the word “sticktuitiveness” again. We want data. We want action. We want something real. Who’s going to give that to us is anyone’s guess, but Elizabeth Warren is on my short list of nominees for the ticket in 2020.

    1. Thank you for your comment. That’s a good plan. It’s expensive.

      Debt is inevitable for so many and you may never work in the field you study. Might as well study what makes you happy. That may be the only silver lining.

      I recommend studying in an expensive city to maximize salary potential at nearby employers.

    2. Actually the cost of living in AZ is reasonable and we’ve just approved a $12/hour minimum wage. ASU is also improving its education model.

    3. If she’s staying there, she’s set. ASU merged with Thunderbird, a gradschool I looked at out there. Several of my high school classmates went to ASU or UofA. One even went to NAU.

      I’m happy about the AZ minimum wage increase. I talk about that in last week’s post about Wage Theft. That’s the best solution. We know what we need: give us a living wage, and we’ll take care of the rest.

      I’d be interested to know how much local coverage Arpaio is getting. There’s a national spotlight there, and I’ve certainly written about immigration in general at least four times on TrumpDiaries alone, but sometimes people in distant states are more concerned about certain issues than are the locals.

    4. Thanks for letting me know. From what I’ve read, issuing a pardon is determining that someone is guilty so it doesn’t matter whether the defendant pleads guilty or not. However, given that pardons don’t require any reason and that they are irreversible, no one’s really cares about the details.

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